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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> here are the developments we're following this morning on the disaster in japan. president obama is allowing family members of u.s. government workers in japan to evacuate. arrangements are being made for charter flights. an earlier white house order told americans in japan to stay at least 50 miles away from the fukushima nuclear plant. japanese military helicopters have been dropping water on that crippled plant today. they're hoping the aerial assault will cool off the reactors and avoid a total meltdown. >>> the japanese stock market opened lower today. taking back yesterday's gains. the yen soared to a new high against the dollar on the currency markets. >>> finally, while the world watches the tragic events in japan, many wonder what we can do here to help. this includes one little massachusetts girl. >> she sprang into action selling her most precious items in hopes that she can help those who need it the most. here's tricia taskey of our affiliate wggb. >> here. >> this is autumn. and it's going to be hard for me to give her away. >> reporter: 7-year-old sage freeman is p
) you heard people saying what's happening in japan so far is worse than three mile island, but not as bad as chernobyl, well, okay. it is good to understand that, but it is also good to understand that there's a lot of room between the consequences of three mile island and chernobyl. not just the magnitude and type of accidents themselves, but the consequences of those accidents. how much radioactivity was released, and what it did to people. the on-going crisis in japan is about trying to minimize the amount of radiation that's going to be released from the reactors at daiichi. understanding the difference between this disaster and previous nuclear disasters is empirical. it is understandable even if you're not a physicist. i certainly am not. we have six reactors in japan together at daiichi. three of them, numbers one, two, and three were on, were producing power when the earthquake hit. they automatically shut down, now it has been a matter of keeping enough water flowing into the cooling systems of the reactors to keep the hot radioactive fuel rods covered up so they
the every-changing situation in japan. we'll have live updates on "america this morning" and later on "good morning america." also stay up to date any time at abcnews.com. >>> moving on to other news beginning with libya. four "new york times" journalists who have been covering the fighting there are now missing. pull its zero prize winning reporter anthony shadid, stephen farrell and photographers tyler hicks and linsey add dario were last heard from on tuesday. meanwhile, moammar gadhafi's forces have been battling rebels in a key city in eastern libya. there could be a vote today in the u.n. security council on whether to impose a no-fly zone over libya. >>> meanwhile, secretary of state hillary clinton was in cairo talking through an unscheduled stroll -- taking an unscheduled stroll through tahrir square, the symbolic center of egypt's revolution. she urged egyptians to not let extremists ruin what they've already accomplished. clinton saying she will not stay on as the nation's top diplomat if president obama is re-elected. she also says she has no interest in another run for the whit
by the moment in japan as more radiation is spewing in the atmosphere from the damaged nuclear plant. david piper in the air base west of tokyo. good morning, david. >> martha: the nuclear crisis is a dangerous level now. the fukushima nuclear complex has had a number of a explosion and they are saying it is moving to a dangerous level and the international nuclear agency said that fire started in a storage plant that spent nuclear fuel. japanese officials told them the fire was out now because they reportedly had help from the u.s. military. radiation leveled have sored around the complex. japanese authorities told people to seal doors and winnows and stay in home and avoid going out at all. japanese prime minister said radiation is released from the three reactors from the nuclear plant and a high risk of more radiation coming out. reactors are over heat raising the risk. japan has imposed a no fly zone over the plant. high levels of radiation in tokyo and now reportedly dropping. but just outside of tokyo there are above the normal level by 10 times. back to you in the studio. >> martha:
. >>shepard: i am shephard smith reporting from a frigid night from japan as the nuclear situation appeared earlier to be spinning out-of-control, and we are just getting word that the operator of the the tsunami crippled nuclear plant has almost complete add brand influence power line that could restore electricity to the complex and possibly solve the crisis. this as the head of the international atomic industry confirmed part of a meltdown if reactors one, two, and three of the crippled fukushima power plant calling the situation "very serious." and says he is headed to japan now to deal with the crisis in person. right now, it is difficult to get specifics about what exactly is happening inside the plant. we do know a fuel storage pond at one reactor is believed to be leaking radiation now. and there may be some damage to the containment vessel. crews are desperately trying to keep the fuel rods cool, to prevent them from burning through the concrete containers, and sending mass amounts of radioactive material into the atmosphere. japan's defense minister reports that shoppers had to ab
americans who are in japan it is time to consider getting out today, thursday, march 17th, 2011. >> from nbc news, this is a special edition of "today," disaster in japan with matt lauer and meredith vieira. live from studio 1a in rockefeller plaza. >> good morning. welcome to "today" on a thursday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm savannah guthrie in for meredith who is on assignment. a sign of how desperate things are in japan that they are willing to try such a long shot. helicopters dropping water from the air. >> want to take a look at the video right now. as you can see when they do that a significant amount of that water seems to be dispersed by the wind. now massive high pressure water cannons, the kind you have seen police use on rioters will be used to hoes dose down the reac from the ground. more on this desperate attempt just ahead. >>> growing disagreement today between officials in japan and here in the u.s. over the severity of the situation. the chair of the u.s. regulatory commission believes a storage pool holding highly radioactive spent fuel rods may be completely empty at
: "fox and friends" starts right now. >> martha: the last on the story out of japan. workers in the failed nuclear physicists riactor site are getting set to go back to work. one report said the workers niver left that site and then reports that they evacuated 50 corgous people who were staying there to try to cool the nuclear physicists reactors . we have had conflicting reports. >> brian: four of those men are missing. they were working on one of the reactors. we'll follow up on that. >> martha: unbelievable story . new pictures show at least two of the plant's reactors are completely destroyed . we have seen the araeil shots . trying to figure out what to do next to prevent a complete meltdown there. >> brian: when tempco was fulling -- pulling out the prime minister demanded what was going on and demanded they go back. >> steve: we'll go to ykoto air force base. david piper is standing by. >>reporter: the new crisis piraling oust control. in a desperate move japanese military helicopter was sent up with a huge bucket of water to dump it on the fukushima plant. they had to
>>> good morning. breaking news. a surge in radiation levels at the crippled nuclear plant in japan forces emergency crews to evacuate overnight. while they are now getting back to work, there are new fears that those 50 heroic workers could be running out of options today, wednesday, march 16, 2011. r captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a wednesday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> good morning, everyone. i'm savannah guthrie. meredith is on assignment. you just think about the pressure those workers must be under, the sacrifice they may be making. they are being dubbed the fukushima 50, one of the last lines of defense against an all-out meltdown. >> imagine the concern when they were temporarily pulled from the plant overnight after radiation levels spiked for a short term. another concern, the second fire reactor number four today, where spent fuel rods are being stored. >> in a rare appearance, japan's emperor delivered a televised address saying he was, quote, deeply worried, but urged people not to give up hope. we are going to have
counter-terrorism terrorist. >>> we want to follow the latest on japan, the nuclear disaster and unfortunate news to report. dangerous levels of radiation are now being reported well beyond the government radiation evacuation zone of that nuclear power plant. right now, everyone within 13 miles of the daiichi power station, they have been ordered to leave within a 13 mime radius. now, they say radiation has exceeded radiation levels in a village 25 miles northwest of the plant. the 7,000 people who live there have not been ordered to leave but the iaea is now advising the japanese government to carefully assess the situation there. >>> meantime, two states on the west coast of the united states are reporting low levels of radiation showing up in the milk. health officials in san luis oh b obispo, california are saying it's not a significant threat but still there and not a surprise says blair thompson of the washington dairy commission. let's listen. >>> traveled across the jetstream and pacific ocean and landed on our shores. it's hardly a surprise that happened, expected. r
the authorities have made clear they did not intend to release him. now to japan, where the woes of the fukushima nuclear plant continue unabated. today, the country's nuclear safety agency said it has discovered the highest levels of radiation to date in seawater near the vicinity. -- to the facility. they acknowledged for of the six reactors at the plant will need to be scrapped. the company's process checked into a hospital with high blood pressure and dizziness. -- the company's loss check into a hospital. >> from the strip -- from the stricken plant to the sea, radiation is leaking. they don't know how or where it's coming from, but the levels are extraordinary. the government insists that contamination will be deleted as it spreads. this man is not sure. he farms seaweed 120 miles south of the plant. he's trying to salvage his nets, wrecked by the tsunami. the problems for -- the problems further north really worry him. >> we will be in trouble if the radiation comes here. we don't just work at sea, we form rice and vegetables also. we are about to plant our rice. we don't want radiation on
informed. but there is just so much going on right now, what with japan and libya, the 2012 presidential race that half an hour just isn't enough. even if i leave out all the facts. so tonight, i'm going to cover it all at once. colonel gadhafi announced he's going to travel to iowa to dump sea water on the nuclear reactors which were attacked by france and england in retaliation for the earthquake, which polls show is the most qualified candidate. >> all right. welcome to "morning joe." it is 6:00 on the east coast. too bad we're not there. good morning. it's thursday, march 24th. joe and i are in los angeles again this morning. what time is it here? >> it's 1:15. here in los angeles, elizabeth taylor passed away. they are asking whether elizabeth taylor may have been the biggest movie star ever. of course, america will be remembering her over the next few days. >> she might have been. >> there is for so many reasons, through so many decades she was married to john warner, a senator. but he was number four or five. but also, of course, in the '60s and '70s. most really, most associated
that adds to the bad environment. and they love it in japan. it sells, sells, sells. think about it. we have a cat. i'm going to spray chemicals all over the couch now. oh, it smells so good. >> okay. just stop it. >> it's messed up. >> as far as we're all concerned, the number one company to work for, comcast. >> philadelphia's own. >> we have a new adjective. >> i'm been comcasted. >> absolutely. >> if you look at those companies and look at the lead her made them, risk takers. i think what we need more of in this country is risk takers. >> yes. >> we have to break out of the doldrums we're in and we need risk takers. donald trump for president. >> oh, lord. >> no doubt about it. >> you have a nice thing and went somewhere else with it. >>> we'll be right back, "morning joe." my mother froze everything. i was 18 years old before i had my first fresh bun. the invention that i came up with is the hot dog ez bun steamer. steam is the key to a great hot dog. i knew it was going to be a success. the invention was so simple that i knew i needed to protect it. my name is chris schutte and i got m
it the largest public debt in japan hit a wall. the japanese debt is about double the size of its $5 trillion economy. it is not a question of whether they are too big to fail. many of the photographs have become part of the picture two weeks after the earthquake and tsunami struck japan. the crisis in japan and the impact on global economics. springfield, ill., back to your calls, republicans only, what issues will define the gop primary next year? good morning. caller: i think the biggest issue is for whoever the candidate or is is for them to espouse conservative values. if they are very conservative in their policy or the programs that they put forth, that will attract a lot of the common americans whether they are democrats or republicans or independents. i think most americans espousing those views. to me, it will be about conservatism and pocketbook issues. it will be about whether or not they feel they are better off than they were four years ago. i don't see that happening. i think there is a malaise and a true conservative candidate will be able to marshal the forces to be elected i
to make an argument. >> a good point. recently come back from a trip to japan. and we are now here in washington talking as we tape this, but you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas and you have done a lot of that. what i am trying to understand is, in a way, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, it is not enough. why do you make the trip? you have seven responsibilities they cut into a decision, because it costs a lot to send you and a lot of people overseas. why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say it was a science. it's not. a lot of this is i feel impelled to go. it is not just that i covered the tsunami in indonesia and southeast asia, but i felt that that was a story that i had to experience tangibly and to see. and as we said, this incredible constellation of disasters. and i felt at the time, at that moment, too, that there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision about where are you best there anchoring. isn't it don hewitt and coined the term anchor
, russia, west europe, and japan and turkey. they preface pages xv to 17 spells out the inputs that the task force had. sometimes brilliant background papers in the end of the report, and particularly one just published on women in afghanistan on the perspective of somebody who was under cover trying to maintain women's schools during taliban rule in their country. with background meetings in a dozen capitols, including a meeting with afghan on all sides from senior officials to the kabul government to the political opposition within that political system to civil society to, yes, persons intimately linked to the insurgency. and we at century, my colleague michael hannah and we provided the kind of support that handwriting what was being told to us by the wisdom of those task force members. they set the course and it's to them that we now turn to outline to you our groups recommendations and findings. so tom? >> thank you very much, jeff, for your very kind introduction and for your setting the stage. i begin by saying the reports findings with the wildly varying were unanimous
. japan. turkey, a special and interesting possibility given its role in the region and its current involvement in afghanistan. perhaps saudi arabia and perhaps others. we are not prescriptive with respect to that. their role would be initially to work closely with the facilitator to help in fact cement ties and bring forward the kind of agreements that are absolutely necessary to see the inner afghan part of the process prosper. the their second role and it will evolve in our view over time to also consult together and negotiate to undertake hollen what with the international community and particularly the region will support what is that the afghans can agree, support what the afghans would like with result -- respect to their future status in the region and the world, is it neutrality or something else? also make commitments themselves on critical questions regarding the future of afghanistan. centrally continued economic assistance and wherever required in the future of the government, security and assistance to help against any of surgeons -- resurgence of al qaeda. as well as
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)